HS2’s tentative survey

HS2 Ltd have recently set up an on-line survey for residents near the railway line which they claim will “help HS2 Ltd improve its communications”.

What is interesting is the tentative nature of some of the questions – a contrast to previous bold assertions from HS2 Ltd that it will be built to the previously stated timeline and budget.

Questions include

  • “How would you prefer to receive information from HS2 Ltd between now and when construction of the railway potentially starts?”

and

  • If the project goes ahead, how often would you like to receive information from HS2 Ltd during construction of the railway?”

Certainly there is no assumption by the survey writer that that construction will start next year or even that HS2 is definitely going to be built.

We are however somewhat disappointed that one of the options on the survey is to receive “Basic information including benefits of the project” but there is no option to get information on disadvantages of the £55 billion HS2 project.

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3 comments on “HS2’s tentative survey
  1. In an attempt identify alternative projects that would provide greater overal benefits for rail users and rail services benefitting a wider range of users, has anyone investigated the upgrading of xisting mainline route to accommodate double decker carriages? Our existing lines are based on victorian construction, with briges that allkow only single deck carriages. Surely the £42+bn for HS2 would cover the of replacing bridges, tunnels and overhead electric power systems with change to spare. This would allow close to double the number of passengers per train. This would result in a rail sytem that benefits all users and not just smallnnumber wealthy business user, at at a lower cost per journey due to the econmy of scale.

    • Have you considered the disruption involved in following such a strategy?

      The (very short) answer to your question is;
      a) Yes, it was considered (probably almost the first idea looked at back in 2010?)
      b) It was dismissed as not cost effective (a fact that is blindingly obvious)
      c) Such a strategy would not deliver the same uplift in overall capacity as HS2 because it would not create a new line in addition to the existing classic network

  2. Let’s have some honesty- true facts; Proper cost forecasts; what value to intermediate areas; secret forecasts; destruction of Colne Valley – An extended tunnel essential.
    Has there ever been such a major project completed at original cost?
    Infrastructure cost – Will the country have enough power – energy supply is priority and with a population said to become 80 million and green policy……..?
    Construction mayhem for 7 years in neighboring areas
    Destruction of agricultural land and woodland- already farming is forecasting food self-efficiency dropping to 50%.
    Are any or all these “off-line factors” costed? If not
    why not ??

    I could go on but I don’t suppose such issues are within HS2’s terms of reference. Thank -you Anthony Ridler

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